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Marnus Labuschagne would have WALKED if there wasn't a TV umpire to look at catch vs South Africa

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Marnus Labuschagne would have WALKED if there wasn't a TV umpire to look at catch vs South Africa

Marnus Labuschagne admits he would have WALKED after the controversial catch without a TV umpire to watch it

  • The Aussie batsman got a reprieve from the third umpire in the Third Test at the SCG
  • The South African players were furious, adamant that Marnus Labuschagne was out
  • The 2022 ICC batsman of the year later admitted that he had trudged off
  • But if video or TV replays are not available for decisions for umpires

Marnus Labuschagne says if video replays weren’t available, he would have gone straight back to the pavilion after Simon Harmer’s catch on the first day of the third Test against South Africa.

Labuschagne seemed unstoppable after lunch at the SCG on Wednesday, punishing Kagiso Rabada and Keshav Maharaj on his way to 70.

But the Proteas appeared to have a breakthrough they followed when Labuschagne hit a Marco Jansen delivery to Harmer, who took a low grab in the slips.

Labuschagne, 28, refused to budge and umpire Paul Reiffel gave a weak show signal as he sent the catch up for review.

Third umpire Richard Kettleborough reviewed several replays and was eventually satisfied there was enough evidence to overturn the poor signal, adjudging Labuschagne not out because the ball had touched the grass before Harmer caught it.

The Proteas players were angry at the decision, led by under pressure captain Dean Elgar (left).

The Proteas players were angry at the decision, led by under pressure captain Dean Elgar (left).

Recent changes in ICC protocols make it easier for the third umpire to overturn the soft signal.

After stumps, Labuschagne said he believed the third umpire made the right decision while adding that at another time, he would have been able to handle Reiffel’s call on the chin.

‘If there is no TV (replays) then I’m walking,’ he told reporters.

‘But in the amount of slow-motion footage you see of the ball, you can see his fingers pushing and splitting.

‘According to the technicalities, some of the ball touches the grass, regardless of whether his fingers are under it or not.

‘It was difficult because back in the day or even before we had this technology or camera work, they would just send you packing.’

South African wicketkeeper Kyle Verreynne made his feelings known on the field to Labuschagne in heated scenes

South African wicketkeeper Kyle Verreynne made his feelings known on the field to Labuschagne in heated scenes

Labuschagne insisted he wasn't out, and he stood his ground, eventually getting a reprieve from the third umpire.

Labuschagne insisted he wasn’t out, and he stood his ground, eventually getting a reprieve from the third umpire.

After the third umpire gave his decision, Proteas captain Dean Elgar objected to umpire Chris Gaffaney, clearly aware of the importance of the dangerous Labuschagne left in the middle at 1-130.

Anrich Nortje signaled that South Africa should use their DRS analysis in the third umpire’s decision.

‘If you look at the angles, to us it looks like fingers underneath,’ says Nortje.

‘Unfortunately we didn’t get that one. I think it’s going to be a big one at that stage. We are convinced that it is out there.’

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Former Test umpire Simon Taufel told Channel 7 that he sympathized with the South Africans.

England captain Stokes believes the ICC should look at removing soft signals

England captain Stokes believes the ICC should look at removing soft signals

Ben Stokes calls for ICC to scrap soft signals after controversial call in Sydney

Ben Stokes calls for ICC to scrap soft signals after controversial call in Sydney

‘It was a tough call,’ he said.

‘Richard’s job was really hard on that one, especially because the camber of the ground went away.

‘I understand why South Africa might feel a bit hard done by there.’

Nortje eventually sent Labuschagne packing once-and-for-all after rain, low light and tea combined to force a two-and-a-half-hour delay.

Labuschagne (79) nicked him to wicketkeeper Kyle Verreynne in what turned out to be the last ball before bad light ended the first day’s action.